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Asthma is a chronic condition

By on Feb 10, 2016 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Asthma is a chronic condition marked by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to wheezing, shortness of breath and coughing. It usually starts in childhood. Asthma is very common. It afflicts more than 25 million people. About 7 million of them are children. An asthma action plan helps you and the school system manage your child’s asthma. It’s a legal document used by school nurses. The plan is specific to your child and describes his or her symptoms, what medicines are prescribed for everyday use, and what medications to give and what to do in case of emergency. If grandparents or other caregivers spend a lot of time with the child, they should have a copy of the plan too. Many schools use an Asthma Action Plan form developed by the South Texas Asthma Coalition. It is available on the Texas Department of State Health Services web site and is organized by the colors of a traffic light — green, yellow and red. Similar to traffic lights, green means go, yellow means caution and red means danger. Green: This part of the plan applies when your child’s breathing is good, with no coughing or wheezing. His or her asthma is under good control, and if your child’s asthma is well-managed it should be in the green zone most of the time. The asthma action plan will list medications they take daily to prevent an asthma attack, the dosages and when to take them — before exercise, for example. Yellow: This applies when a child is having symptoms such as coughing, wheezing or a tight chest. It prescribes how to use quick-relief medicines to help your child breath more easily and prevent the asthma attack from worsening. Red: Provides direction when quick-relief medicines aren’t working and your child is having difficulty breathing and/or continues to wheeze. If your child’s symptoms aren’t improved with quick-acting medications, then it is recommended that he or she is seen by a doctor. The South Texas Pediatric Lung Center at University Health System has launched a new online tool for parents, an asthma symptoms profiler that can help you understand your child’s asthma, how well it’s controlled and how to avoid what his or her particular triggers are.   For full article http://healthfocussa.net/uncategorized/a-plan-of-action-for-your-childs-asthma/ Dr. Donna Beth Willey-Courand is director of the South Texas Pediatric Lung Center at University Health System, and chief of the Pediatric Pulmonology Division at the UT Health Science Center Photo by Mark Greenberg...

Pet Allergies – Is it your pets hair?

By on Dec 17, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Did you know that no matter what breed of ‪#‎dog‬ you have, whether short hair or long hair, doesn’t affect your ‪#‎allergies‬? That’s right! The main culprits that cause allergies are dander, saliva, and urine. Of course none of this can keep us away from pups, especially one as lovable and sweet as Dingo! He swung by the office today with his 86 year old boss in tow to give us a big hello! And of course, to remind us that allergies should never be a reason to keep us away from our furry children. Provided by Dr. Gligoric, MD, Board Certified Pediatric & Adult Allergies...

How to Show a Child With Autism That You Care

By on Mar 13, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Autism can make life difficult at times. There may be communication delays or struggles with social situations. However, if you love someone with autism, there are simple things you can do to show how much you care, including: Understanding individual differences – No two kids with autism are the same and their needs are likely very different. Take the time to understand and appreciate individual differences to truly show you care. Making a repeated effort – Repetition is often very important for children with autism and it may take several tries before things go as planned. Don’t get frustrated. Instead, put forth repeated efforts to show the child how important the interaction is to you. Showing up – Nothing is more important than showing up and being present. Sometimes just being there and enjoying time spent together can make the most impact. Enjoying the simple things – Showing someone you care doesn’t have to be extravagant or difficult. Appreciating and enjoying the simple things is often the best way to connect. At Exceptional Kids we are proud to serve as a resource and information center for the special needs community. We are committed to the needs of children with special needs and their...

Project MEND Helps Disabled Children Find Greater Mobility

By on Mar 9, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Project Mend, founded in 1992, is committed to helping individuals with disabilities gain mobility through the reuse of medical equipment. Project Mend is the only assistive technology and medical equipment organization committed to specifically meeting the needs of low-income persons in the San Antonio area. Several of Project Mend’s grateful recipients have shared how much the medical equipment means to them: Lariah is a five year old that lives with disabilities associated with Mitochondrial Disorder. Her specific needs include maximum assistance to maintain a static sitting position and help for her parents with moving her comfortably. She received a specialty device called a Tomato Chair to help meet these needs. Kaileigh is three years old and is living with severe Cerebral Palsy. Kaileigh cannot use a standard wheelchair because her small body is too inflexible and stiff. Project Mend helped Kaileigh’s mom secure a specialized wheelchair that allows independence for Kaileigh and helps her to better meet her daughter’s needs. Our team at Exceptional Kids is proud to research different things that help kids with disabilities. We are committed to serving as a resource for the special needs...

Help a Child With Sensory Processing Trouble by Turning a Room Into a Place to Stimulate Their Senses

By on Nov 26, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Have you heard of a multi-sensory environment before? This type of space is specially designed to meet the needs of children who struggle with sensory processing. It is a space that will help children explore their senses in a safe environment. If you are thinking of creating a multi-sensory environment for your child consider these tips: Create a Safe Space: Reserve a safe space in the room that your child can retreat to in case of sensory overload. A small tent or space filled with soft pillows works perfectly. Use Soft Lighting: Gradual shifts in light strength and color will provide stimulation without overwhelming your child. Look for innovative light sources such as projectors or fiber optic cables. Provide a Variety of Materials: Ongoing stimulation is best achieved by a variety of materials. Choose items that will keep your child engaged and interested in the space. Keep a Routine: Many children with sensory processing difficulty also benefit from a predictable routine. Engage your child within the room according to your established routine. Exceptional Children is committed to serving parents and kids with autism and other special needs by providing valuable resources and...